Radar Imagery Explained-Interactive eLearning Course

Rod Machado

$ 34.95 $ 49.95

Share:

NEW! Radar Imagery Explained - $49.95 (2.5 Hrs.)
This Is an Interactive eLearning Program - Copyright 2020/Updated to 2020

CLICK Video Icon to the left (or tab above) to learn how to access your eLearning course. These eLearning courses work on all iThingy devices, Android devices, laptops and PCs. Please use Chrome browser to access course links. 

Welcome to this interactive eLearning course on understanding the uplinked cockpit radar imagery you receive on your moving map display. Most likely you’re interested in this course because you’re interested in knowing the meaning behind the many different colors you see on your cockpit weather display. That's what this course is about. 

In this course you'll learn about:

  • The basics of radar theory.
  • Gust/turbulence probability prediction.
  • Why 40 dBZs of reflectivity is such a critical value for all aircraft.
  • Estimating rainfall rates to predict in-flight turbulence.
  • Interpreting the color values of different NEXRAD displays.
  • How different weather vendors use different color scales on their uplinked weather.
  • The strengths/weaknesses of uplinked weather.
  • About ASR-9/ASR-11 approach control radar and convective weather prediction.
  • Center's WARP radar system and Nexrad radar returns.
  • Real time STARS weather radar information.
  • All eLearning courses come with accompanying text in "Notes" section of player.
  • Each course section comes with quizzes to test your knowledge.
  • And much, much more.

This course is intended to help you identify the convective weather that you would be wise to avoid and how to "avoid it" through the use of cockpit radar imagery. This is an essential course for all IFR pilots who use uplinked cockpit weather. It’s also a valuable course for any VFR pilot with uplinked cockpit weather who wants to make better convective weather avoidance decisions in visual meteorological conditions.

Note: Purchased eLearning courses are accessible anytime from the "Customer Login" section, after you log in. 

Here’s how to access your eLearning course. 

1. You can view any eLearning course on one or more of your personal electronic/computing devices. To view this course on an iPad or Android tablet you must download the Free Articulate Mobile player first (see #3).

2. Open your Chrome browser (use Chrome to access these courses) and visit rodmachado.com. Go to the top right side of this page and log into your account or create an account USING THE EMAIL ADDRESS YOU USED WHEN YOU PURCHASED THE COURSE (if you don’t do this you won’t see your course!). Course links are found in the account window.

3. If you’d like to have the course permanently downloaded onto your iPad or Android tablet device, then download the FREE Articulate Mobile Player or the FREE Android Articulate Mobile Player App onto your iPad or Tablet device. Then visit www.rodmachado.com USING your iPad or Android tablet, log into your account and click the link to your course (please make sure you log into your account using the email address used when purchasing this course, otherwise your course(s) won't be present). You’ll be asked if you want to “Launch” the course in the Articulate player. Click “Launch” and the course will open in the player. When you visit the player’s library and click the course icon, you’ll be asked if you want to permanently download the course to your iPad/Tablet device. Click “Yes” and the course will downloaded. If you don't have room on your tablet device for the course, just unclick this button and you'll be able to stream the course at your leisure in a Wi-Fi area or via your device's data plan. Please make sure you have a strong Wi-Fi signal when attempting to download the course permanently to your device.

    "I AM CLOSE TO FINISHING YOUR VIDEO SERIES ON IN-FLIGHT EMERGENCIES. I AM NOT SURPRISED THAT, AS USUAL, YOU DO NOT DISAPPOINT. YOUR PRESENTATION OF INFORMATION IS SUCCINCT AND EASY TO ABSORB. PLEASE GET IN CONTACT IF YOU ARE EVER IN ATLANTA." SINCERELY, WILEY ALLEN

    "JUST FINISHED IN FLIGHT EMERGENCIES. BEEN FLYING FOR 21 YEARS RECREATIONALLY. VERY VALUABLE INFORMATION." DAVE HARTDORN 

    "I JUST WANTED TO TAKE A MOMENT TO EXTEND A "WELL DONE, SIR" ON YOUR IN-FLIGHT EMERGENCIES COURSE. I FOUND IT EXTREMELY HELPFUL AS A REFRESHER.  I MIGHT ADD, I DID MANAGE TO PICK UP A FEW NEW POINTERS AS WELL. I HOLD A COM-SEL/IA AND FLY A MOONEY 201J. I HAVE ABOUT 2300 HRS TT. I'M BASED HERE IN THE FLATLANDS OF NJ AT 31E. AGAIN, THANK YOU FOR PRODUCING AN EXCELLENT  COURSE." REGARDS, TOM STACKHOUSE MD

    HI ROD,
    I BOUGHT YOUR COURSE, AND I'M ABSORBING IT SLOWLY (THAT'S THE KIND OF BRAIN I HAVE).  IT'S MOST INSTRUCTIVE AND ENJOYABLE - THANK YOU.   I HAVE LEARNED PLENTY, AND EXPECT THAT TO CONTINUE." MIKE RADOMSKY

     

    Stay in Touch

    Physical Product Ordering Only (800) 437-7080

    If you'd like to order a PHYSICAL product by phone, please call the number above. Digital (downloadable) products can't be ordered by phone.

    Latest Posts

    • It's Time to Speak Up

         “Hey Rod, tomorrow I’m taking my little airplane out to see what it can do. I’ll see ya later.”   Those were the last words I ever heard my best friend speak. I never saw him again. The next day,... read more

    • The Forgotten Mechanic

      The Forgotten Mechanic Here’s today’s riddle: Name something that all pilots need and use all the time, often don’t know by name, and depend on completely for the safety of every flight. The answer isn’t obvious, and neither is this... read more

    • Weber's Law

      By Rod Machado If you closed your eyes, held out a cup, and asked someone to gently pour water in it, how much liquid would need to be added before you noticed a change in weight? One drop? Probably not.... read more

    • It’s a Long Way Down, Isn’t It?

      Psst! Psst! Come here. Come a little bit closer. I’ve got something I want to ask you, and I don’t want anyone else to hear. Are you afraid of heights? It’s probably embarrassing to admit it, but if you’re like... read more

    • A Foot in the Mind

      By Rod Machado Psychologist Robert Ornstein, in his book Evolution of Consciousness: Origins of the Way We Think, talks about a person he knew as Jim. Jim’s reputation was based on his ability to get others to do things for... read more

    • Dive and Drive: Fact or Fiction? Maybe Both?

      By Rod Machado I am a "dive and drive" denier. There, I said it and I'm not taking it back. The term "Dive and Drive" is used by some instructors in the pejorative sense. It's a pointy phrase that's released like a... read more

    • Pilots, Poets & Psychologists

      By Rod Machado Mention the word poetry to a pilot and he'll act like he's in a hotel fire. He'll think: get low, get down, get out. Admittedly, even I get the heebie-jeebies at the mere mention of haiku (that's... read more

    • The Power of Flight Simulators

      Flight Training on a Budget By Rod Machado Over a period of two semesters, a young college student with two intro flights in his logbook acquired approximately 60 hours of supervised training using a desktop flight simulator. Curious to test... read more

    • The Prevalence Error - Why We Look but Do Not See

      Looking Good, but Seeing Little By Rod Machado Recently, I was having a difficult time seeing things that were in plain view. I was even thinking about visiting the Our Lady of Fatima Optometry Center, where their motto is, “If... read more

    • The Middle-aged Aviator

       By Rod Machado Over the years, I’ve heard many stories about middle-aged pilots (45-65 years) who gave up flying due to a sudden onset of anxiety. Apparently this wasn’t induced by any specific aviation trauma nor inspired by the relatively... read more

    • Cargo Cult Thinking

      By Rod Machado  Early in the 20th Century, pilots visited remote islands by air, dropping off goodies for Tarzan and Jane. On subsequent visits, these pilots noticed that the natives had built flimsy stick-and-twig replicas of their airplanes. Anthropologists named... read more

    • Recent Changes to Part-61 and Why They Are FANTASTIC!

      By Rod Machado Am I happy about the recent changes to FAR Part 61? You bet I’m happy. These changes will be helpful to general aviation in much the same way a corkscrew is to a Frenchman on Bastille Day.... read more